Device Review: Yealink T58A Skype for Business Phone

Today I’m reviewing the Yealink SIP-T58A desk phone. Like its little brother (which we reviewed last time), this is a softphone designed for Skype for Business users. I put it through the same paces as the T56, within the same Skype for Business deployment.

Not surprisingly, it had very similar results. But they’re not identical phones…and they aren’t meant for identical uses.

As promised, I’ve included some use cases in this post. Instances where one phone works better than the other. Consider this post as a ‘Part 2’ to the previous post.

Ready? Let’s get to the T58A review!

Initial Impressions

The Yealink T58A is, like you’d expect, just a slightly more feature-rich iteration. It has the same dimensions as the T56A, the same desk footprint, and the same standardized phone layout with touch screen.

Here they are side-by-side. Can you spot the difference?

Yealink T56 and T58 Phones

Hint: Look at the touch screens.

Design-wise, the only notable difference between the T56 and T58 is that the T58’s screen is adjustable. In nearly every other aspect, they are identical.

Yealink T58 Adjustable Screen

Because they’re so similar, I took a little more time with this model. Just in case it had any quirks only prolonged use reveals.

(Impromptu test: I accidentally dropped the handset before I could connect it to the cord. Luckily, nothing bad happened! It didn’t even scratch on our concrete floors.)

I did face the same sign-in challenge on the T58A as I did the T56A. It’s set to accept only Trusted Certificates by default. My contact at Yealink says they do this as a security measure. So it’s not really an issue as I said before…I can certainly envision topologies where this makes sense.

The same change we used last time worked here. Here’s the documentation again: Phone Cannot Get Provisioned with Certificate Error – Yealink Support

Once I flipped that switch, zero problems signing in to Skype for Business.

The Major Difference: Video Call Capability

If the T56 and T58 are so similar, why make two different models?

The answer is on the T58’s back. It has a vertical slot in its back, above the USB port. You can remove the cover over this slot and reveal a second, upward-facing USB port.

Yealink T58A Back

From Yealink.com’s page on the T58A:

“You can easily turn your SIP-T58A smart media phone into a video phone ready with an optional removable two-megapixel HD camera CAM50.”

Yealink T58A Camera USB Port

The T56A doesn’t have this slot available. A co-worker commented on the camera slot’s use of USB. It meant you could also plug a USB cable in, moving the camera to a better angle if desired.

Yealink T58A Camera USB Port from Above

It is a USB 2.0 slot, by the way.

Now we know why they made two models. One can take a video expansion module; the other cannot. This makes for a huge difference in use cases. I’ll go over that in a moment.

Please note: This is the SIP-T58A model. That means its camera works with SIP…NOT Skype for Business. Another phone version does that.

That said, let’s go through some testing!

Using Skype for Business on the T58A

Like its brother, the T58A shows favorited Skype contacts on its Home screen. The options, and simplicity of use, are the same too.

I also discovered that both models preserve account details. I disconnected both the T56A and T58A from PoE. Left them idle for a day. Then plugged them both into another PoE cable at a co-worker’s desk.

Both models saved my Skype4B account login. I only had to unlock the phone, and poof, there’s my Presence status & contacts. Nice going on this one Yealink.

Call Quality: Almost an exact mirror to the T56A. One thing I did notice was that the “Noise Proof” technology came through a little better on the T58. That could be due to my listening for it, though.

Voicemail: In a stroke of good luck, I had several voicemails come in succession one day. (Murphy’s Law, you walk away from your desk, and everybody calls…) This gave me a chance to test out the voicemail controls more heavily than before.

You reach voicemail on the T58A through its “Menu” button.

Yealink T58A Menu

I tried both ways of dialing into voicemail:

  • Dial in, then pick up handset
  • Pick up handset, then dial in

No trouble either way.

Bluetooth: The Yealink team encouraged me to test out Bluetooth on the phone. I had to update the firmware in order to do this; the version shipped with the phone didn’t have Bluetooth enabled yet.

(NOTE: A new firmware just came out a few days prior to my review. If you buy a Yealink after reading this, your phone’s screen will look different.)

Updating the firmware took 5 minutes. Well, 10, if you count the download time.
Yealink Support – T58A Downloads

Once I’d updated, Bluetooth appeared as a rocker switch in Settings. You can enable Bluetooth and WiFi from the Web admin menu, or directly on the phone.

Yealink T58A Bluetooth Setting

From there it’s the typical pairing process: Open the Bluetooth screen on the phone, wait for BT devices to show up in the “Available Devices” list, and tap to pair.

I paired my Jabra Motion Office headset. I keep its base wired to my laptop dock. To test, I disconnected the base from my dock, so it couldn’t field calls coming from my laptop.

Shortly afterward, two calls came in. The Jabra started beeping right away, just like it normally does.

I did notice a slightly shorter ‘walking range’ while taking these calls though. When my Jabra takes a call from the laptop, I can walk clear across the office and still have a nice clear call. When my Jabra took the calls through the T58, I got a little crackle of static when I walked about ten feet away.

Nothing huge. All in all, the phone did a good job of working with my Bluetooth headset.

Issues: Security/Hacking Concern

A reader messaged me after the T56 post went up. “Yealink phones get hacked all the time. Don’t use them!”

I checked on this, and did find several reports from people dealing with hacked Yealinks. All older models though. I searched specifically for the T56A and T58A, but didn’t come across hacking reports on them.

That doesn’t mean it’s impossible. Far from it! But the reader’s warning raises an extremely important point, not just about Yealink phones:

Whenever deploying a new VoIP phone, no matter the manufacturer, make sure it’s fully secured before issued to the user.

Default passwords changed. Firewall in place. Logging enabled. Ports closed. It’s another computer on the network…thus, a potential cyberattack vector. Treat it like one.

Use Cases for the T56A and T58A

Given how similar these phones are, it took me a while to determine separate use cases. They’re both solid phones, with an extremely useful Web administrative menu per device.

I did though! Here are some use cases where each of the Yealink T-Series phones would serve well.

T56A:

  • Run-of-the-mill desk workers.
  • Compliance-heavy workstations, if regulations prohibit display of certain materials in a video feed. Even accidentally.
  • Multiple branch offices, in a bulk deployment (especially if you manage the branch offices’ IT remotely).
  • Common Area Phone. Both models have a CAP function in their settings. I prefer the T56 here since it’s a simpler device with no video.

T58A: All of the above, as well as the following.

  • Branch Management phones, for frequent conferencing.
  • Sales/Marketing team phones, for quick video calls.
  • Customer Service phones…in case you really want to embody ‘customer-facing’!
  • Small-team conferencing phone (though Yealink does have a series of conferencing phones, called the “CP Series”).
  • Non-Skype for Business VoIP deployments. The camera add-on works with SIP video…but this version doesn’t work for Skype for Business video. That’s the Yealink T58A Skype for Business Edition.

Now, what are some use cases where Yealink makes a good choice, as opposed to other SIP phone brands (e.g. Polycom, AudioCodes)?

  • You run Skype for Business Server on-prem or hybrid.
  • Moving to Teams IS on your radar. Yealink has T56 and T58 models configured for Teams use.
  • You have multiple offices, but similar communications needs (which means you can standardize deployment & save time/money).

The Verdict: An Easy-to-Use, Expandable Desk Phone for Power Users

Now that I’ve completed my reviews, I handed the T58A over to the co-worker I mentioned last post. His turn to play. He’ll also put the phone through its interoperability paces, in our own network and at customer sites. It has to work within our security parameters before he’ll sign off on customer use.

Yealink T58A SIP Phone

I do like the T58A’s video expansion option. But I personally don’t use video much. It’s a nice-to-have for standard users. For power users though, it’s necessary. Which is why I say power users would get more value from the T58A than the T56A.

You can get the Yealink SIP-T58A from Jenne.com.

Does your office use Yealink SIP phones like these? Please share your impressions in the comments.

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Device Review: Yealink T56A Skype for Business Phone

Time for a new device to review! This time we have a new desk phone: the SIP-T56A from Yealink. Matt at Jenne.com kindly sent me this unit for review, after we expressed interest in the Yealink line.

The T56A is designed for Skype for Business use. It does support expansion modules, as well as Bluetooth & Wi-Fi connectivity, and plays nice with Office 365.

Would Yealinks serve as a good alternative to Polycom phones, if we couldn’t get a Polycom (or the customer didn’t like them)? Will they stand up to the daily grind? How well do they work with Skype for Business?

Let’s find out!

Initial Impressions

I unboxed the T56A as soon as it arrived. Pulling it out, I did a quick comparison to the Polycoms we have around the office. The T56A weighs about the same as those, but it’s wider. You’ll need a little desk space for it.

Yealink Phone Unboxing
Yealink T56A Unboxed

It’s a pretty straightforward phone console. Buttons for hold, transfer, volume, mute, etc. Build quality’s solid; nothing about this feels flimsy or loose.

Yealink T56A Dialpad

The phone comes with a big touch screen attached. You can’t adjust the touch screen on the T56, but at least it’s low-glare. You can lower its brightness too, under Settings > Basic > Display > Backlight.

Yealink T56 Phone Setup

The T56 doesn’t need a separate power adapter if you use PoE (but one is optional). I plugged this in to a PoE network cable.

Issues: Signing In

The phone booted as soon as I plugged in the PoE cable. It brought me to a nice simple start window within about 20 seconds.

Yealink T56A Boot

Once the phone finished startup, it brought me to a Sign In menu right away. I had three choices: An Extension/PIN sign-in, a Skype for Business sign-in, or a Web sign-in.

Yealink T56A Skype for Business

(Side note: Since the phone sent me straight into Sign In, I didn’t realize for several minutes that I could just hit Back a few times and reach the phone’s main menu!)

Now, here’s where I had the one issue. I had some difficulty getting signed in. It wanted me to use an extension and PIN at first, but I didn’t have those. (I did try my previous phone’s extension and PIN, but alas, no use.)

Next I opted for the Skype User Sign In. We run Skype for Business Server 2015 on-prem, and this phone used a PoE cable to connect. Should be no problem at all, right?

I entered my sign-in address (email), username (the same email), and my Skype4B password. Took me a couple tries to figure this out; the instructions didn’t specify the format.

When I did get the right combination, I saw the following error: “Cert web service not found.”

Hmmm. Did we have an issue with our on-prem Front End? I checked with the Consulting team. No, the Front End’s fine.

I checked online and found the solution: In default settings, the T56A only accepts Trusted Certificates. This can inhibit initial sign-ins, even on secured Skype for Business Front Ends.

Luckily, the fix is simple. Yealink has it documented on their Support site: Phone Cannot Get Provisioned with Certificate Error – Yealink Support

The phone also has a Web administrative menu. You access it by entering the phone’s assigned IP into your web browser, like most such devices (e.g. “http://192.168.1.1”). The instructions contain the default login & password for this admin menu.

The fix involves disabling the Trusted Certificate Only option in the admin menu, under the Security tab. Once I did this, I discovered a very handy shortcut. Instead of returning to the phone and re-entering my login, I could sign into Skype4B right from the admin menu!

All I had to do was click the Account tab, enter my login & password, and boom. The phone recognized the sign-in and displayed its main screen. Ready for testing!

Using Skype for Business on the T56A

The T56A main screen shows favorited Skype contacts. You have a bottom toolbar with four options: Favorites, History, Contacts, and Menu. Menu gives you the Calendar, Voice Mail, Status, Setting, and Meet Now buttons. All styled consistently with Skype for Business.

Yealink T56A Main Screen

The phone’s DEAD-simple to work with (heh heh). I replaced my normal desk phone, a Polycom CX300, with it to test out. I anticipated some learning curve, of course…it would take me a couple days to familiarize myself with the different ways to make & handle calls, right?

Nope! Within minutes I had this phone down. Unlock PIN set, favorites configured, and I know where & how to change my Presence status in two taps.

I connected my Jabra Motion Office headset to the T56A as well, using the headset port on the back. No configuration necessary.

Yealink T56 with Jabra Headset
T56A hanging out with my Jabra headset.

Now, the most important aspect of a phone: Call Quality.

Since I replaced my Polycom with the T56A, it handled all my calls for the past week. The handset is marked HD, and judging by call quality, it’s true. Everyone’s voices came through as clear as could be, whether co-worker (internal) or customer (external).

(Even the recorded spam message came through nice and clear. No idea how they got my number…)

To illustrate the call quality, let me draw a comparison. When you talk with your co-workers on one device, and then switch to another, you can tell which device is clearer, can’t you? You already know their voice. Your brain knows how they should sound. So when one device carries their voice sharper than the other, you notice.

That’s what happened during my T56A testing. Voices came through sharper on the T56A than on my prior phone (the Polycom CX300).

I found out afterward that this happens, at least in part, due to Yealink’s “Noise Proof” technology. The phone actually blocks out background noise while you’re on a call. I’ve seen this demonstrated on other phones before. The fact that I didn’t think of it until well after my calls says Yealink did a good job with their own version.

The Web Admin Menu: Yealink’s Secret Superpower

The Web administrative menu is incredible on these phones…I can configure every aspect of the phone from my browser. From changing ringtones to upgrading firmware.

Yealink Web Admin

Not only does that save a HUGE amount of provisioning time, it means I can totally avoid hunching over the phone, tapping out letters on the touch screen.

Don’t get me wrong; it’s great that the T56A has a touch screen in the first place. The screen has a good response rate, analogous to an Android smartphone. But if I can save a few minutes typing on my laptop’s keyboard, so much the better!

Having a comprehensive Web admin menu makes a big difference for IT professionals. It means we can provision devices remotely, with ease.

All we need is the phone’s IP address when it’s plugged into the network. The IP address is under Settings > Status. With that, we can take care of Skype for Business configuration, security updates, directory control, and so on. The user just has to plug the phone in!

The Verdict: An Excellent Desk Phone for Skype for Business Users

I showed the T56A to a colleague. He handles hardware deployment for most of our Skype for Business customers. Most of the time he deploys Polycom phones, with Jabra or Plantronics headsets.

He saw what this device can do and his eyes almost popped out of his head! “Why didn’t we have this before?!” He started throwing out names of customer sites where he could place them. I stopped him at #5. He could have kept going. Coming from him, an IT pro who’s worked with dozens of device manufacturers over the past 25 years, I consider that high praise.

You can get the Yealink SIP-T56A from Jenne.com.

Next up I’ll test the T56A’s brother, the Yealink T58A. I’ll include a comparison of the two models, and good use cases for both. See you back here next time!

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Do We Still Need the Skype for Business Director? In One Instance, Yes!

The poor Director server role. No longer needed by Teams, its primary function usurped by Azure AD for Office 365…Microsoft’s march into the future seems to have passed right by it.

Now, this is not the first time Microsoft has left a server by the digital wayside. But I have a special place in my heart for Directors. I like the concept, and what it embodies, Looking at the Skype for Business/Teams ecosystem now, I thought Directors would join Microsoft Bob and Small Business Server on the trash heap.

But I found a little light instead…one instance where it does still make sense to deploy Directors in today’s world. Let’s find out what that is!

What a Director Does, and How Skype for Business Changed Around It

I first wrote about the Director way back in 2012: What’s the Director For?
I characterized it as a sentry on the castle walls. Permitting only legitimate Lync/Skype for Business users entry.
That’s what a Director does—it provides authentication for users, so the Front End Server/Pool doesn’t have to. The Front End carries on with facilitating calls, Meetings, etc. while the Director handles authentication.

Now, the Front End CAN handle authentication requests as well. It never needed the Director. Having a Director server/pool helped in two ways:

  1. Ease congestion on the Front End Server/Pool, which often translates to better call quality & Meeting stability.
  2. Defend against DoS attacks targeting the Skype for Business Server. Not a common threat, but a growing one in recent years.

So the analogy still holds. You can still use a Director as a sentry, defending your Skype for Business deployment.

The Director Role and Offloading Authentication in Skype for Business 2015 – IT Pro Today

Director as Authentication Sentry
You shall not pass! …unless you brought me a treat!
Photo by Kenan Süleymanoğlu on Unsplash

But what if the deployment structure changes?

Which is what Microsoft’s done. By first offering a Hybrid deployment option with Office 365, then introducing Teams and beginning to fold Skype for Business Online into it, Microsoft’s slowly pulling the rug out from under Directors.

What about authentication requests though? How will Teams and Office 365 manage all those requests in your tenants?

Skype for Business Hybrid and Teams: Director’s Role Usurped

Since Office 365 tenants handle authentication through Microsoft’s cloud-based Azure Active Directory, they don’t need on-prem authentication from a Director. But what about hybrid deployments?

In most hybrid configurations, authentication’s done through on-prem Active Directory and Azure AD. Azure AD syncs to your on-prem Active Directory server, providing a built-in failsafe. Directors become superfluous.

However, Directors are still mentioned as a possible hybrid topology component on Microsoft’s Plan hybrid connectivity between Skype for Business Server and Skype for Business Online page:

To configure your deployment for hybrid with Skype for Business Online, you need to have one of the following supported topologies:

  • A mixed Lync Server 2013 and Skype for Business Server 2015 deployment with the following server roles in at least one site running Skype for Business Server 2015:
    • At least one Enterprise Pool or Standard Edition server
    • The Director Pool associated with SIP federation, if it exists
    • The Edge Pool associated with SIP federation
  • A mixed Lync Server 2010 and Skype for Business Server 2015 deployment with the following server roles in at least one site running Skype for Business Server 2015:
    • At least one Enterprise Pool or Standard Edition server
    • The Director Pool associated with SIP federation, if it exists
    • The Edge Pool associated with SIP federation for the Site
  • A mixed Lync Server 2010 and Lync Server 2013 deployment with the following server roles in at least one site running Lync Server 2013:
    • At least one Enterprise Pool or Standard Edition server in the site
    • The Director Pool associated with SIP federation, if it exists in the site
    • The Edge Pool associated with SIP federation for the site

“If it exists.” In other words, the Director is not critical to these hybrid topologies.

What about Teams? Since Teams will absorb Skype for Business Online anyway, does Teams need a separate authentication server?

No. It’s not designed that way. Even if it was, as a fully cloud-based application, Azure AD will handle the authentication. A Director isn’t listed anywhere in the Teams dependencies for guest access…only Azure AD.

(Whether or not Azure AD handles guest accounts & user expansion WELL is up for debate…but we’ve talked about that already.)

Director on guard duty
Yeah, the fence keeps people out. But I still hang out here, in case someone climbs over it…
Photo by Elizabeth French on Unsplash

It’s safe to say that for Office 365 and Teams, Azure AD usurped the Director’s role. That leaves us with one other potential use: the upcoming Skype for Business Server 2019.

Directors Going Away? Not Quite. Not Yet.

The Director sees a tidbit of salvation in our next on-prem Skype for Business Server. Ever-knowledgeable Tom Arbuthnot hints at the Director staying in Skype4B Server 2019, citing it under the 2019 System Requirements on his blog: Skype for Business Server 2019 Public Preview, What’s New, What’s Gone? – Tom Talks

Edge Servers, standalone Mediation Servers, and Director: 6-core, 2.4 gigahertz / 16GB RAM / 8 or more 10000 RPM disks or SSD / Gig NIC/ dual Gig NIC for Edge

These may seem steep. But they’re almost identical to Front End Server requirements; the only exception is that Front End needs 64 GB RAM.

I can see many admins using requirements to justify dropping Directors from their 2019 deployments. In truth, our IT Consulting team hasn’t installed a Director in any Skype for Business deployments (on-prem or hybrid) since early 2017.

However, after some discussion and brainstorming, I realized the Director is in Server 2019 for a reason. One Skype for Business topology does exist where a Director helps.

The One Deployment Topology Where a Director (Still) Makes Sense: Director on Guard

Here’s my “Director On Guard” topology. The deployment must meet all of the following characteristics:

  • Enterprise business
  • Installing Skype for Business Server 2019
  • Fully on-prem
  • More than 2 office locations
  • 1,000+ users
  • The company has suffered a cyberattack in the past

Why these? I’m so glad you asked.

  1. An enterprise business will want the control and security they can exert over data trafficked within Skype for Business. This also gives them control over their phone system.
  2. More than 2 locations means branch servers to maintain the call network. More than 1,000 users means thousands of authentication requests every single day.
  3. A cyberattack? Nothing makes cybersecurity more important than suffering a cyberattack. (I wish this on NOBODY, but it’s a tragic reality of our world.)

In this case, the Director serves a purpose. It performs its original function of handling authentication requests, taking load off the Front End pool and preserving bandwidth. All worthwhile performance goals, which makes IT look good to the budget-conscious C-suite.

A Director also provides additional guard against cybercriminals. Post-cyberattack security improvements go a long way toward securing the network, and user workstations. The Director performs a similar role within the Skype for Business ecosystem—a central component of the enterprise business’ communications.

It’s doing its time-honored job…being a silent sentinel, ready to admit those who have authorization, and defend against those who do not. Hence my terming it, “Director on Guard.”

If we don’t get an on-prem Skype for Business version after 2019, it’s likely the Director role will fade with it. That’s okay…it’s done its job. But for now, don’t count the Director out yet. With cyberattacks on an upward swing, all systems need protection. Including Skype for Business.

Do you still use a Director in your Skype for Business deployment?

 

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How to Access Skype for Business and Teams Services on Linux Computers

Want to access Skype for Business or Teams on Linux? You’re not alone. I wrote a post back in 2014 titled, “Lync on Linux: How to Access Lync Services on Linux Computers.” It remains one of the most-read posts on this blog today, almost 4 years later.

I decided to revisit the topic after seeing that in my analytics. What kind of Linux-based tools did we get (if any) since then? I’ll include Teams in this post too, since that’s where Skype for Business is (mostly) heading. Let’s see what the Linux landscape holds, shall we?

The Big Question: Did Microsoft Make a Skype for Business for Linux? Will They?

First, the bad news: We still don’t have a Linux version of the Skype for Business app.
Installing Skype for Business on Linux – Microsoft Community

A check on the Office 365 roadmap confirms zero items related to Linux. People definitely want it though, according to this SkypeFeedback.com thread:
Linux Desktop Client for Skype for Business – SkypeFeedback.com

Given the dearth of results, I don’t think we’ll ever get a full-version Skype for Business Linux client. But that doesn’t mean we close the door. Other options do exist, in varying categories of usability.

What kind of tools are out there? Desktop clients do exist. Web apps as well, in case those don’t work or have too few features. Let’s not forget the Android platform as well…more people use Android than iOS worldwide.

Linux-Based Skype for Business Tools, and How Usable They Are

1. Skype for Business Web App
Can you use the ‘official’ Skype for Business Web App on a Linux computer? Not…really.

The Web App installs a browser plugin to work. Said plugin, unfortunately, only works on Windows. You can install a Windows VM and use the Web App. But at that point, you might as well install the desktop client! As such, this is a ‘just barely’ option.

Skype for Business Web App Under Linux – Reddit

Skype for Business Video
“What do you mean you can’t turn on video? They must see my cuteness!”
Photo by Pete Bellis on Unsplash

2. Tel.Red Sky Linux App
Tel.Red has built & maintained a Linux client for Skype for Business for several years. They call it Sky Linux. There’s a free version with call limits. Full versions costs $49/year per user…quite reasonable.

I put this in the “not bad” category. It DOES work, in most cases. It’s missing some meetings-related and call-related features though, such as delegates and video-based screen sharing.

3. Pidgin+SIPE Plugin
This solution lands in the “OK, a bit clunky” category. As I mentioned in the 2014 article, the Pidgin IM client has a Linux version.

It does not natively support Skype for Business communications. For that, you’ll need the SIPE plugin.

With the two working in tandem, you can connect to Skype for Business servers and chat. One caveat though…the SIPE plugin hasn’t received an update since February of last year. Which means it may not like working with the newest sharing & meeting features. Your mileage may vary, depending on configuration.

Still, it’s a good effort, and I want to commend the SIPE developers for their work. Add-ons like these can fuel huge growth in software capabilities—something very worth our support!

Linux Skype for Business
The Code of Linux grows…
Photo by Sai Kiran Anagani on Unsplash

4. Android App
This goes in the “Best Option” category. You’ll get the most features and the easiest install/configuration.

Yes, Skype for Business does have an Android app! Skype for Business – Google Play

The app does have limitations of course…you can’t present a program from Android, do Consultative Transfer, or use meeting tools like the whiteboard. (In fairness, the iOS app has most of the same limitations.)

Feature Comparison between Skype for Business Desktop Client and Mobile Devices – MS Docs

Its latest version seems plagued by login troubles though. Frustrating, but the app still beats other options for native Linux functionality.

What About Teams on Linux? Much More Accessible

When it comes to Linux, Microsoft Teams is another matter. Because Teams runs in the Azure cloud, you can get to it in a browser on Linux. You may not have full feature access though; our good friend Tom Arbuthnot reports that Teams doesn’t have audio/video support on Linux. You may get audio if you use Chrome, according to Tom’s comments.

Microsoft says a native Linux client for Teams is “on the backlog.” Which explains why it doesn’t show on the O365 roadmap either.

UPDATE 10-17-18: Aaaand Microsoft pulled the plug on a Linux client for Teams. Sorry folks. Wish they hadn’t done that. But they did.

However, the Teams Android app is going strong. It just got an upgrade in fact: Microsoft Teams for Android Updated with New Call-Related Features – MS Power User

While I’m glad Teams works on Linux, it appears the Android app carries even more functionality. So your best bet for Teams on Linux is to use that!

Teams Made Further Linux Progress Than Skype for Business

In the 2014 post I joked that more Skype-related development would come…mostly from the Linux community. Now, I wasn’t wrong! But with Teams eventually supplanting Skype for Business, and Android apps getting more focus, Microsoft’s definitely paying SOME attention to the Linux side of things.

Linux Lemons
Linux gets some lemons. But it’s good at making lemonade!
Photo by Ernest Porzi on Unsplash

That said, we have a Windows desktop client for Skype for Business and Teams. We have iOS and Android apps for Skype for Business and Teams. We do not have a native Linux client for Skype for Business or Teams. Will we get one? Maybe for Teams. For Skype for Business? Probably not.

What’s your Linux/Skype for Business/Teams situation?

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Dissecting the Free Teams Offering

Microsoft has released Teams as a free offering. No Office 365 account required. But how viable is it as a standalone chat app?

That’s what we’re looking at today. I’ve setup a fresh Teams account for testing. We’re looking at how useful it is for everyday communications, what limits exist compared to Office 365’s Teams, and how this may or may not affect Skype for Business.

I will share this up front – I don’t think a free Teams harms Skype for Business at this stage. But it may harm another Microsoft property.

Setting Up a Free Teams Account

Normally, Microsoft requires you to use a Microsoft Account with its offerings. In the case of the Team free offering, they’ve relaxed this requirement. They only require “any corporate or consumer email address.”

I do have a Microsoft Account for my work email, of course. But I decided against using it for this test. Why? I read some comments on TechCommunity indicating a problem with registering a free Teams offering, and then later trying to set up Teams in Office 365. If you use an email associated with an Office 365 tenant already, or one you may associate in the future, Teams will try to set you up in Office 365 instead.

There’s also this comment by Microsoft’s Albert Chen, which references a one-Teams-only limitation for email addresses:

Albert Chen Microsoft Teams
The highlight reads, “Currently, each email can only sign-up for one Teams free organization, however you can be invited into both of them.”

We may just have a growing pain here. But I opted not to take the chance. Instead, I used a Gmail account I set up years ago for Google-related reports at work. That way I don’t cause any trouble if the office decides to move to Teams later on. (Which we might…)

Setting up “Teams Free” is very simple. Head to https://products.office.com/en-US/microsoft-teams/free and enter your email address. The setup is entirely guided and only takes a few steps, so I’ll skip detailing it here. Suffice to say it’s no more difficult than signing up for a new Skype Consumer account.

Once I’d completed setup, clicked the Get Started link in the welcome email, and downloaded the Teams desktop app? Off to the races!

Teams Welcome Screen

Features and Limitations in Teams Free

At first glance, Teams Free looks exactly like its Office 365 brother. To a large degree, they share feature sets. But, with any free offering, you’d expect some limitations…and Teams is no different.

What’s Available:
Unlimited Chat? Check.
Teams Channels (as many as you want)? Check.
Activity Feed? Check.

Teams Chat Options
There’s our old friend “Meet Now.”

File storage/sharing? Check.
Third-party add-ons? Check.
Audio and video calls? Check and check.

You have your choice of desktop and/or mobile apps. Even our little buddy T-Bot shows up. In terms of everyday chat and calls, Teams Free works just like Office 365 Teams.

What’s NOT Available:
According to the Teams Free page details, the free version does NOT have:

  • Exchange email hosting
  • Custom email domains
  • Full-version OneDrive, SharePoint, Planner, Yammer, and more Office 365 services
  • Scheduled Meetings
  • Meeting/call recordings

Finally, it has a file storage cap of 2GB/user (with a max 10GB of shared storage).

Most of these limitations make sense. Teams Free operates outside of the Office 365 ecosystem (technically), which means no direct access to shared services and email functionality. The rest seem meant to restrict the file storage needed on Microsoft’s side. As well as provide incentive to upgrade!

Teams Free
The Upgrade button is under “Manage Org” in your profile.

Teams Free’s Effect on Skype for Business: Negligible

We already know Teams will eventually replace Skype for Business within Office 365. Teams Free isn’t likely to hurt those plans…in fact it’ll likely help them, as freemium offerings have in the past.

My question is, will Teams Free hurt Skype for Business Server? I don’t think so. Consider the differences in setup, and the feature approach each takes.

Simpler Setup. The setup process for Teams Free roughly equates to Slack’s in terms of time. That is much faster than Skype for Business setup, but they have different audiences. Skype for Business Server addresses comprehensive communications needs for larger businesses. Teams and Slack, however, target smaller businesses who move fast & prefer chat apps just as quick.

Small-Business Features vs. Enterprise Capacity. Teams Free has a 300-user limit. Skype for Business Server does not. Companies using Skype for Business Server likely have regulatory compliance requirements. Teams users likely don’t.

If anything, Teams Free will hurt Slack’s user base. With a fresh, free offering, Microsoft may lure existing Slack users away from their paid accounts. The timing may even capture some soon-to-be-former HipChat & Stride users.

However, I can’t say Teams Free won’t hurt another Microsoft communications tool…

Will This Hurt Skype? That May Be the Plan

Microsoft’s offering Teams Free as a chat platform for everyone. They can send messages, call people, even do video. All it takes is an email address. Sound like anything else to you?

ChatOps War
Surprise takedown! Hey, aren’t you on my team…?
Photo by Quino Al on Unsplash

Sounds like Skype Consumer to me. Which may be the point. Microsoft may want to reduce Skype Consumer’s use in the workplace by wedging in Teams Free.

In total, releasing Teams for free accomplishes three goals:

  1. Competing more directly with Slack
  2. Attracting more people & businesses to the full Office 365 suite
  3. Luring small businesses & some individuals away from Skype onto Teams

Why do Goal #3? I think because it feeds into Goal #2. Many businesses use Skype Consumer for day-to-day communications. It’s free, it works (well enough), and it’s simple to use. Now we have Teams Free, which meets all those criteria and even expands on the feature set.

Does this mean Microsoft will shutter Skype Consumer? It’s possible…but I wouldn’t hold my breath just yet. They have bigger moves to make.

Teams Free is Late to the Battle, But Don’t Dismiss its Power

There’s one more factor to consider in Teams Free adoption: Existing Teams users. Smaller businesses may opt to cancel their Office 365 subscriptions and move to Teams Free, if they don’t need all of the features full-version Teams offers. Add in Slack or HipChat/Stride users who didn’t want to buy into the Office 365 ecosystem before, and Teams Free may build up its user base via poaching.

The ChatOps War continues to rage. It’s already claimed casualties. Teams Free is up against entrenched opponents. But it presents a good-enough-for-most feature set and a stable platform. The coming months may see quite a leap in its adoption.

Are you using Teams Free in your business? Please share how well it works for you in the comments!

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6 Questions about Atlassian Discontinuing HipChat & Stride

By now you’ve likely heard about Atlassian’s shuttering of its HipChat & Stride products. The decision has many implications, from Atlassian’s future as a company to the ChatOps space worldwide.

HipChat Logo
Still smiling!

Other bloggers have asked important questions about this move. How will this affect Slack users? Will Stride users go to Slack or jump ship to Teams?

All valid questions. But in this post, I’d like to ask a few others. Questions which came up during my own reading. Some already have answers. Most don’t…those will come with time, as the shuttering takes effect & the market responds.

I’m documenting these 6 questions here for discussion’s sake. If you currently use HipChat or Stride, you have a decision to make before 2019. I hope these questions help you tackle it.

Any & all feedback welcomed…particularly from current HipChat/Stride users!

 

Six Questions We Need to Ask about HipChat & ChatOps as a Whole

The Developers Question. HipChat is, as I understand, popular with developers. Particularly developers who work on Atlassian products. Finding another chat platform is easy for a developer…but will Slack try to make them welcome? Developer discussions can get very technical, with code snippets and live testing on the fly.

Slack does have code snippet capability. But so does Teams. So does Google Hangouts, to a degree.

Atlassian-friendly developers will need an environment that contributes to their work, via app integrations and workflows. How well the Atlassian/Slack partnership works will make a big difference.

 

The Mid-Market Question. ChatOps products like Stride, HipChat, and Slack are popular among mid-market companies as well as enterprises. Yet I’ve seen enterprises as the exclusive focus for most of the current speculation.

In our own experience, this is where ChatOps are taking root. More mid-market customers come to us asking about chat platforms like Teams than the reverse (us introducing them to chat).

Will Slack actively court those mid-market companies? I know Teams does this. And you can bet other chat platforms will too.

 

Atlassian Logos
“Please don’t leave us too!”

The Question of Atlassian’s Other Products. I saw a few angry tweets after this announcement. HipChat/Stride users feeling betrayed. Not wanting to go to Slack; if they wanted that, they could have done so months prior.

Nothing says they have to move to Slack. But what if after the February cutoff, they abandon the entire Atlassian product base?

Teams does have Add-Ons for integrating Atlassian tools like Trello and Jira. You can also duplicate much of their functions with other Add-Ons or cloud services. Even so, this could end up hurting Atlassian’s overall product base. I would NOT encourage this (I like Trello!) …but it’s undoubtedly possible.

 

The “Work Processing” Question. I came across this in a CMSWire article covering the announcement. I quote from the section titled, “‘Work Processing’ Tools Emerging”:

Boyd noted that despite enterprise collaboration tools like Slack, Teams and Facebook grabbing headlines, a new generation of document-centered tools — Quip, Notion.so, Slite, Nuclino, and others — are gaining steam. He calls them “work processing” tools. They support shared documents with styled text, embedded objects (tables, videos, images), tasks and checklists and social affordances: threaded comments, internal notifications and messaging.

“In this approach,” Boyd said, “documents are not just dumb files with styled text, sitting in a cloud file system. Instead of relying on work chat communications, which are only structured by channels and search, work processing relies on a system of documents to structure company information and discourse. This can also be integrated with work chat, or may include work chat internally. A trend to keep an eye on.”

I fiddled with Notion.so a little. It’s similar to a Wiki, using Markdown and simple workspaces. Since it’s document-based, not chat-based, this sort of tool represents a totally different approach from Slack or Teams. (I may do a more in-depth comparison in the future; it’s got a certain appeal.)

These newer products may tempt people away from Slack into a leaner, more all-in-one workspace. It may become a wild card in adoption/migration.

 

The Privacy Question. I’ve mentioned HipChat Data Center when talking about the Redis Cache, and the Skype4B Quagmire. Like Skype for Business Server, one of its biggest advantages was the privacy benefits of on-prem deployment.

Now we have one less option for those companies who require on-prem data control.

You do still have Skype for Business Server 2015/2019, of course. But with its future uncertain, some might see switching off HipChat to Skype for Business as a risky bet.

“But Slack protects your data privacy too!” Correct! So does Teams. The issue here isn’t what privacy protections exist…it’s whether companies will accept cloud-based privacy vs. on-prem privacy they control. It’s a comfort issue, not a technical one.

 

Finally, the Mattermost Challenger. Mattermost competes with Slack, but is open-source. Any organization can deploy it, either in a private cloud or on-prem.

Here’s the kicker. Mattermost also integrates with other Atlassian products: Jira, Bitbucket, Trello. It not only competes with Slack, it can directly target the HipChat/Stride users Atlassian wants to shuttle over to Slack.

Setting up Mattermost requires a little more technical know-how than Slack, which may get in the way of courting HipChat/Stride users. Nevertheless, more tech-oriented companies may consider jumping ship to Mattermost instead.

 

Predictions for Post-Discontinuation (Feb 2019)

Abandoned ChatOps
Okay, I’m here for the meeting! …guys?

Photo by Yener Ozturk on Unsplash.

As I like to do, I’ll close with some predictions. In light of questions like these, what will happen after HipChat & Stride go offline in February?

  1. The majority of Stride users will switch to Slack with little fuss.
  2. A large portion of HipChat users will move to Slack as well.
  3. A small percentage of companies running HipChat Data Center will continue to do so, even without Atlassian support.
  4. Trello, Jira, and Confluence will all suffer drops in usage. Since users have to abandon HipChat and Stride, some companies will abandon all Atlassian products at the same time.
  5. Teams/Office 365 will see a small boost in user growth after February, from those HipChat/Stride users who don’t want/can’t use Slack.
  6. “Work Processing” tools like Notion.so will see growth on an organic basis. The HipChat-to-Slack transition won’t have much of an effect.

 

Additional Links:
Slack and Microsoft Teams: Is Enterprise Collaboration a Two Horse Race? – CMS Wire
How Slack and Atlassian Landed a Sharp Jab in Microsoft’s Ribs – CIODive.com
Atlassian-Slack Partnership FAQ

Do you use HipChat or Stride? What will your company do in light of the discontinuation?

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A Tour through the Teams AppSource (App Store)

Did you know you can add third-party add-ons to a Teams channel? Let’s see what happens when you do!

Microsoft calls these add-ons “Teams Apps.” They work like Chrome browser add-ons…a way to integrate third-party software into the Teams experience.

They even have their own app store: AppSource – Microsoft Teams
(You can also view Apps within Teams, by clicking the “Store” button in the left column.)

For this blog post, I installed some Teams Apps in our internal Teams channels and tested them out. I went with some fairly simple Apps, but you can find much more complex ones in AppSource.

I chose Asana and MailChimp for this test. Asana is a project management tool. We already use Asana in our office, so it’s a natural choice. We switched from MailChimp to Campaign Monitor years ago, but we know plenty of businesses who still use & love MailChimp. (Plus I still have a MailChimp account for testing!)

Teams AppSource CRM
The CRM Category in Teams AppSource. Kind of wish they had a Hubspot connector; would love to see how their CRM works within Teams. I’m sure it’s coming!

 

Installing Apps into Teams

Apps are connected to Teams channels, not the overall Team. Installation is pretty darn easy…just a few clicks to select, grant access, login to the third-party account, and voila!

Teams Apps Added

First, the steps for installing Asana.

Add Asana to Teams 1
The Install screen tells us what the Asana add-on will do.

 

Add Asana to Teams 2
Office 365 must have permission to grant third-party access through its Connectors. Click Allow.

 

Add Asana to Teams 3
You’ll need to sign into your Asana account on the next screen. Then select an Asana workspace & project to follow. Click OK and done!

Next, installing MailChimp.

Add MailChimp to Teams 1
Same as before; the Install screen tells us what MailChimp’s add-on will do.

 

Add MailChimp to Teams 2
Some Apps will display an extra screen for permissions: one for the app/service, one for Office 365.

 

Add MailChimp to Teams 3
Here’s the Office 365 Connector, requesting permission. Use your Office 365 account username & password.

 

Add MailChimp to Teams 4
Fewer options for MailChimp, but the same process – select the appropriate MailChimp account, and report frequency.

 

Add MailChimp to Teams 5
The MailChimp App is added! This screen shows in your Teams channel.

 

Now, the next big question—how do we USE these Apps?

It actually depends on the App. For Asana, we only need to configure the Asana projects the App will monitor. Whenever someone creates or comments on a task within those projects, we get a notification in Teams.

Asana Task Notifications
Two instances of Asana tasks appearing in my Teams channel flow. Note how easy it is to jump over to Asana if needed, or just mark tasks as Complete right from Teams.

 

Zero effort. Plus, getting notifications like this shaves one window off your daily checks.

MailChimp will display campaign performance reports, likewise eliminating a window to check. Connectors like these simplify the workday by consolidating information flow into the Teams channel.

Other connectors, like Help Scout (updates from customer support emails) or Pingdom (notifies you about website incidents) facilitate add-on services from within Teams. You may need additional configuration.

Caveat: Apps Can Overwhelm Your Channel

The old adage is true…you can have too much of a good thing. In this case, too many Teams Apps can blot out normal conversations.

Most Apps automatically notify the Teams channel when their event is triggered. Asana will report a new task, or MailChimp will pop up a new campaign performance report. The automatic setup lends convenience. But the more you use Asana and MailChimp, the more frequently you get notifications in Teams.

It’s easy to see the problem. One notification-clogged Teams channel, coming right up!

Of course, you could create a fresh Teams channel and assign App notifications to it. But then you’ve just created another checkpoint for yourself and your team. Instead, I recommend limiting the number of Teams Apps you’ll need. Only add the ones whose notifications add value to your conversations.

Use Teams Apps Whenever They Help You Stay Productive—And Don’t Disrupt Everyone Else

When deciding which Teams Apps to add, consider the whole team’s priorities & daily activities. Does everyone use Asana? Then chances are everyone will spend time in Asana anyway. You don’t need to add it to Teams. Conversely, if half the people on this particular Team use Asana, then adding the Teams App helps them save time and doesn’t cause too much disruption.

If you use many other online services, but only need to interact with them occasionally (e.g. Pingdom only sending alerts when a site’s down), then adding them as a Teams App makes sense. Provided they HAVE a Teams App, that is. Not everyone does yet.

Still, there’s plenty of choices in the AppSource already. Go take a look!

Which Teams Apps do you have installed?

 

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Software Add-on Review: SuperToast V3

Never Miss a Skype for Business Notification Again

In early 2016 I wrote a post titled, Making Sure You See Skype for Business Notifications—No Matter What!.

In said post I reviewed a notification app called SuperToast, made by Modality Systems. It remains one of the blog’s most-read posts today. Evidently lots of Skype for Business users miss notifications…

The other day, Louise at Modality asked if I’d like to review the new, redeveloped SuperToast V3. Of course I was happy to do so!

What is SuperToast?

The SuperToast app sits in your taskbar. Every time you miss a Skype for Business call or Instant Message, SuperToast displays a notification popup with details about the missed event.

Chat Notification
Someone is chatting with me!

SuperToast notifies you of missed Instant Messages, incoming audio/video calls, and missed audio/video calls.

Missed Call Notification
Can’t talk now, writing this post.

The notification windows only displays the first message someone sends. If for example you receive 4 messages in succession from one person (as my co-workers sometimes do), you’ll only see one SuperToast notification. Which is smart—nobody wants a stream of popup windows blocking other work!

The SuperToast settings could not be simpler. Here’s the entire settings window.

SuperToast Settings
The SuperToast Options window. Five settings. Nothing else needed.

You choose which communication types for which you want to receive SuperToast notifications via checkboxes. That’s it.

What’s New in V3

The new SuperToast has two main improvements over old versions.

  1. Full support for the latest Skype for Business clients.
  2. Bug Fixes:
    1. Notifications appearing despite you being active in the conversation window
    2. Not bringing the conversation window to the front when clicking on a notification

The UI is largely the same as before. Which helped it fold back into my day-to-day routine almost immediately. But after a few weeks’ testing, I can say V3 is more stable now.

Two Versions: Single-Use and Business-Wide

SuperToast comes in two versions:

  • SuperToast One is a single-user version.
  • SuperToast for Business is a business version with central management.

SuperToast One has a few limitations the Business version doesn’t. You can’t customize SuperToast One’s look & feel, no central admin, etc. Pretty much what you’d expect for a single-user.

SuperToast One costs $7/year. SuperToast for Business costs $7/year for 5-99 users, $5/year for 100-999 users, $2.50/year for 1000-2499 users, and $1/year for 2500+ users. So no matter which version you buy, or how many, you’re only paying a few dollars a user per year. You even get 24-hour support with this too.

They used to have a free version. Now there’s a free 30-day trial.

Incoming Call Notification
Hold on, better take this. Be right back.

Who Can/Should Use SuperToast?

Modality developed this app to support Skype for Business users. Like us, they didn’t like missing notifications from co-workers or customers. The app works with Skype for Business Server and Online (O365) deployments.

Lync 2013 users still hanging on? SuperToast will work for you too.

That said, here’s a brief mention of SuperToast’s limits. It has 3 that I can determine:

  1. No Mac version yet.
  2. I am not certain if SuperToast will work with the Teams desktop client.
  3. As many commenters pointed out on my 2016 post, this IS a third-party app. Some organizations block third-party apps from user’s devices on security grounds. That is perfectly valid—we see malware apps all the time on customer PCs!
    In such cases, I’d recommend using SuperToast for Business. Its central management and Modality’s reputation should dissuade any security concerns.

I do know that Modality continues to work on SuperToast. We may see these limits resolved fairly soon. If I hear of timetables for such, I’ll update this post accordingly.

SuperToast in Taskbar
Runs in the taskbar. Quiet. Unobtrusive.

Super for Putting Missed Calls/Conversations in Front of Your Eyes

SuperToast is a single-purpose app. It does one job…and it does it well. Plus it’s cheap to buy. I always like simple apps like this; they don’t require a high learning curve, and provide an immediate benefit.

For those who miss a lot of notifications in the course of a workday, SuperToast makes for a quick, valuable solution.

SuperToast Page – Modality Systems

Used SuperToast before? How was your experience?

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5 Ways to Conceal a Teams Channel

We can’t make fully private channels in Teams yet. But we can conceal a channel from other Teams users.

Private Channels has taken the top spot at UserVoice, as the most-requested Teams feature. Microsoft is, as of this post, “Working on it” with no indication of a release date.

Support for Private Channels – UserVoice

You can make a Team private, of course. But within that Team, channels are visible and searchable. If you really need to keep a conversation private, that kind of defeats the purpose, doesn’t it?

So what are Teams users doing in the meantime? Using workarounds, naturally. Or staying outside of Teams altogether (email, Slack, Skype for Business, etc.).

What kind of workarounds do people use? I’m going to list 5 in this post. Together they form a framework for ‘concealing’ Teams channels & their contents. Privatizing them, essentially, as best you can.

Dog Hiding
Hopefully your channel’s a little better-hidden than this…but you get the idea.
Photo by Pippalou on Morguefile.

When to Conceal a Teams Channel

Why would Teams users need private channels in the first place? A multitude of reasons exist, all valid. In my research I came across several compelling ones:

  • The channel would contain a set of information involving legal or compliance processes, which means it must fall under those same requirements.
  • The channel would contain, and thus need to protect, a customer’s private data.
  • The channel would discuss internal tests or R&D data.
  • You’re planning an office party for the CEO/CIO/COO/VP’s birthday and they can’t find out early. (Hey, it’s possible!)

I’m sure you can think of other reasons to conceal a Team conversation. But please remember: Teams conversations are hosted on Microsoft’s servers. That doesn’t mean Microsoft spies on them. But the servers may reside outside the U.S., which could jeopardize regulatory compliance adherence like SOX or GDPR.

Okay! Let’s see what “concealment tactics” we have in Teams. You can use any combination of these, including all of them (they don’t conflict with one another).

 

Concealment Tactic #1 – Make a new Private Team

When you make a new Team, you have the option to set them to Public or Private. The first step, then, is to set the entire Team to Private. Then create your channel. You don’t have a Public/Private switch at channel level; that comes from the Team setting.

Private Team
Creating a Private Team.

Make a Public Team Private in Teams – Office Support

What This Accomplishes: Prevents unauthorized users from joining. Locks the gate.

 

Concealment Tactic #2 – Equip the Team with an Access Code

Generating an access code is simple within Teams. In your Team, click the Options menu (the ‘…’). Click “Manage Team.” In the Manage window, click the “Settings” tab.

You should see a “Team Code” section. Click it and you’ll get a Generate button. One more click and poof, a randomly-generated access code to that Team. Copy the access code and give it to your selected members.

If a member doesn’t have the access code, they don’t get in. Nice, huh?

Teams Code Access
Generating a Teams Access Code.

How to Enable Join Code Feature in Microsoft Teams – TechCommunity

What This Accomplishes: Provides a secondary authentication for Team members. “What’s the password?”

 

Concealment Tactic #3 – Limit Team member permissions

In the Team’s settings (accessible via “Manage Team” under the Team’s Options menu), remove permissions to add bots, add connectors, or delete channels from invited Team members.

Teams Member Permissions
Your Team permissions should look similar to this.

What This Accomplishes: Guards against information leaks. Shuts the back door.

 

Concealment Tactic #4 – Lock down the files with SharePoint permissions

Maybe you’re not too concerned about others viewing your Teams conversation. But you want to make sure the files you’re discussing stay private.

Since Teams files are stored in the Team’s SharePoint site, you can block people from viewing those files. Bob German showed us all how to do it in an April blog post:
Using SharePoint Permissions in Microsoft Teams Channels – Vantage Point [MSDN]

What This Accomplishes: Privatizes file permissions, including viewing. Stows the valuables in a locked chest.

 

Concealment Tactic #5 – Archive the Team when no longer necessary

If you want a private Team/channel for a specific purpose, and that purpose completes, then you don’t need the Team/channel active anymore. As with older data, it’s best to archive the Team.

Archive Team
Archiving a Team with One Click.

Archive or Restore a Team – Office Support

Now we see why you need to make a dedicated Team…you can’t archive a channel. Archive works at the Team-level. (Note: You can restore an archived Team later if you need to.)

What This Accomplishes: Locks down the Team’s data in cold storage. Closes the blast doors.

 

Next-Best Thing to Teams Private Channels While We Wait

Many commenters on UserVoice said they’d left Teams, or wouldn’t switch to Teams from another chat app, because of Private Channels. Hopefully these tactics will help dissuade you from the more drastic steps!

It’s a bit of a stopgap, I know. But Teams does have these tools for a reason. Concealing channels through private, secured Teams will serve most privacy needs. Until we get Private Channels.

How do you protect your chat conversations?

 

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The Future of Enterprise Skype for Business Server: Your Feedback

What will enterprises do with their on-prem Skype for Business deployments after 2020? What factors weigh upon those decisions? I asked you…and you answered!

I received several responses from enterprise admins, all running Skype for Business Servers on-prem. Some went as I expected…while others gave me a few surprises!

Dog Sounding Off
Sounding Off!
Photo by Robert Szadkowski on Unsplash

Thank you to everyone who responded. Now it’s time to collate the feedback and see what the future may hold.

These are my overall feedback impressions:

  • All respondents knew about the 2020 on-prem ‘deadline’
  • Most have a plan to address it already, but those plans have either not begun or are still in debate with Management
  • Cost is one major factor, but Call Performance and Maintenance are equally important
  • Approximately half were in favor of moving to Teams. Half were not.

Let’s go through all of these.

Expected Costs, and What’s More Important

I didn’t get much in the way of direct numbers. Some admins had their Skype for Business costs wrapped into larger server stacks; others had third parties supporting their Skype4B and would have to take time away from other projects to request numbers. C’est la vie.

What numbers I did get indicated the following…

Costs for (virtual) servers averaged around $1500-1800 per, over 5 years. However this didn’t appear to weigh heavily on future updates/migrations. Since deployments are complete by now, install costs aren’t seen as a consideration. Neither is power, curiously enough…no one brought it up as a cost concern OR post-2020 savings.

The bigger cost concerns are:

  1. New user licenses & phones. If we assume a deskphone like the Polycom VVX 300, then the phone cost is about $100. Add $36 for a user CAL and you have $136 per new user. Not a huge cost, but one that adds up over time.
  2. Maintenance. Costs for monthly server maintenance ranged from almost $0 to nearly $500. This concerned the majority of respondents. While server maintenance is a part of every admin’s life, it takes up time we could use productively elsewhere. Regaining that time through a reduction in servers – or a cloud migration – appeals to most.

Which costs would they save on with Teams? Most said administrators. Going from 4 admins to 1-2, for example. Reduced need for maintenance = less admin time required = fewer admins ultimately needed.

(This is not to say you should drop all admins when going to Teams. Our own experience shows that Office 365 is NOT 100% maintenance-free!)

One respondent, Rob G., said it wasn’t really a matter of cost—but rather performance. From his feedback:

“The reality is, enterprise security teams/policies will end up pushing many companies to ‘as a service’ solutions not due to any inherent cloudy advantages but simply because it’s the cheapest way to shadow IT any latency-sensitive applications out of a dynamic security agent network.”

Interesting position to take…and illuminating. Whether or not costs change, at least one enterprise will move to Teams for performance’s sake. I have to admire such a position, honestly.

The Skype for Business ecosystem advanced real-time, Internet-based voice communications a LONG way in the past few years. Still some hiccups though, depending on bandwidth and systems architecture. Focusing on performance makes a lot of sense for any company with thousands of employees under its roof.

After 2020, Skype4B Enterprises Will Scatter

So, the original question:

Is moving to Teams/Office 365 at enterprise-level really a cost savings over on-prem Skype for Business?

In some cases, yes. In some cases, no. But it turns out that the question itself is immaterial.

Some enterprises will move to Teams, even if it costs more. Others will move to another on-prem UC solution. A few will cling onto Skype for Business Server until the very last.

When that time comes, we’ll have to check back in with everyone. See what factors are in play then!

Future Planning
“I’m not sure this is the best way to plan our next systems deployment, Alex.”
“Too late to back out now, Mike. Oh, and check.”
Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Running an on-prem Skype for Business Server? What are your plans for the future?
 

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