Category: Exchange

How to Preserve Unified Messaging

3 Ways to Keep Voicemail & Auto Attendant when Upgrading to Skype for Business 2019

Those of us who use voicemail in Skype for Business face a quandary.

We did get a new Skype for Business Server, as well as a new Exchange Server. But we’re missing one component: the Unified Messaging service in Exchange Server 2013/2016. Exchange Server 2019 will NOT have Unified Messaging.

The sysadmins reading this already know what that means. They can feel it as a sudden clench in the chest. Skype for Business’ voicemail needs Unified Messaging. Without it you’ll end up upgrading a part of the office’s phone system away!

Two, actually…the Auto Attendant’s gone too. No more, “Press 1 for Customer Service. Press 2 for Sales…”

What do we do? If your offices use Skype for Business on-prem and employ Unified Messaging for voicemail and/or Auto Attendant, it’s time for some alternative thinking.

Fortunately, we’re all IT pros. We’re good at creative solutions. That’s what we’ll have to do here, to preserve Unified Messaging.

The Path to IT Solutions

The IT professional’s configuration thought process. (Sure feels like it sometimes, doesn’t it?)
Photo by Jaromír Kavan on Unsplash.

Right now we have 3 ‘preservation’ options, each with different levels of expense & usable time. Time to run some comparisons!

Voicemail/AA Preservation 1: Keep Your Exchange 2013/2016 Server On-Prem

This is a way to preserve UM within the Microsoft infrastructure. It involves juggling between different versions of Skype4B and Exchange. Essentially, you upgrade your Skype for Business Server to 2019…but not your Exchange Server. It stays at its current version. Accounts and configuration intact.

You’ll need to undertake several processes. Changing the UM dial plan, voice policies, etc. It all depends on your existing Exchange Server’s configuration. Here are resources to help you:

VERDICT: The most direct solution. With a critical flaw – it has a lifespan. Exchange 2016 will run out of mainstream support in October 2020. Extended Support runs until October 2025, which lets you stretch things more. You’re still faced with the potential of higher support costs the longer you go.

This is the option I prefer, frankly. Even with the lifespan boundary. You retain the most control, and it requires almost no new hardware.

If you don’t run Exchange 2016 already, or the lifespan boundary doesn’t work, then we have Option 2.

Voicemail/AA Preservation 2: Switch to Cloud Voicemail/Cloud Auto Attendant (Hybrid Deployment)

Cloud Voicemail is Microsoft’s response to yanking Unified Messaging out of Exchange. It’s (predictably) a part of Office 365, and requires a tenant to operate. Same with Auto Attendant—now it’s a cloud service too.

Cloud Server Ports

Setting up Cloud Voicemail isn’t that complicated. You must have hybrid connectivity enabled first, of course. I’d even recommend doing this a week in advance, so you can test & verify successful connectivity.

To configure Cloud Voicemail, you’ll need:

  • Your Office 365 tenant account login/password
  • The domain assigned to your tenant
  • Administrative access to your Skype for Business Front End and Edge Servers
  • Administrative permissions on PowerShell
  • At least one test user account

Once you have those together, follow the steps here. It’s basically a handful of cmdlets: How to Configure Cloud Voicemail – Microsoft Docs

If you already have a hybrid deployment, using Exchange Online, Microsoft will transition you to Cloud Voicemail in February 2020.

Cloud Voicemail is not a 100% drop-in replacement for Unified Messaging though. According to ExPTA.com, Cloud Voicemail doesn’t include Play on Phone, call answering rules, text notification, or Outlook Voice Access. Doesn’t mean those won’t show up down the line, but for now, Cloud Voicemail’s sticking to the basics.

VERDICT: If you want to move to Exchange Server 2019, you’ll have to switch either to Cloud Voicemail or Option 3. Exchange 2019 doesn’t have the Unified Messaging service. This might help to gradually introduce Office 365 tools to the company. You also get Teams this way, which could provide a transition path for all staff…if you’re going that way.

Voicemail/AA Preservation 3: Integrate a Third-Party Voicemail/Auto Attendant Service with Skype for Business

This option essentially abandons using Exchange Online, Cloud Voicemail, and Office 365. Instead, you add in a third-party service to provide your users voicemail and/or an Auto Attendant feature.

We have a curious reversal on this track. It’s relatively easy to add in Auto Attendant…several third-party providers exist to do just that.

However, voicemail’s a little harder to add in. I came across two solutions that appear to work with Skype for Business Server:

As far as I know, we haven’t worked with either of these solutions directly in a Skype for Business topology. If you have, please share your thoughts in the comments.

VERDICT: If you do want to upgrade to Exchange Server 2019, but don’t want anything to do with Office 365, this is your only option to preserve voicemail and/or Auto Attendant.

Preserving Unified Messaging: Unfortunate, but Necessary.

I can understand why Microsoft chose to remove Unified Messaging. It falls within their “cloud first” mission, consolidating things like voicemail & Auto Attendant into the Azure/O365 ecosystem. (Must have taken a LOT of coding…)

That said, those of us who appreciate on-prem control now have another instance of “technical gymnastics.” Trying to find a new solution for a resurgent problem.

Unless of course you want to drop Unified Messaging? I can’t think of a scenario when a business would voluntarily drop its voicemail/Auto Attendant…but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. Perhaps you’re considering the idea?

Auto Attendant Virtual Assistant

Maybe use a Virtual Assistant instead? “Hello, you have reached XYZ Corp. Press 1 for Sales…”
Photo by Fezbot2000 on Unsplash.

In terms of how these processes shake out…we do have a full Skype for Business Server 2019 installation planned this year. We’ll most likely use Preservation 1, maintaining our current Exchange 2016 server. (Exchange 2019 will have a separate test.) I will document EVERYthing as we go, and produce plenty of blog posts from that.

If you’re planning a Skype4B 2019 upgrade, which Unified Messaging preservation method will you use?

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The Skype for Business Quagmire Creeping Up on Enterprises

Skype for Business Server has one new version coming. After that, enterprises could get stuck between an economic rock & a financial hard place.

Skype for Business Server 2019 is coming. However, given all the pushes toward O365/Teams, it’s not unreasonable to presume that 2019 will be the last on-prem version of Skype for Business.

This presents a major problem for larger businesses. They will either have to move to Teams, or investigate another on-prem Unified Communications provider.

What’s wrong with moving to Teams? Nothing! …except possibly cost. When you scale up to enterprise-level user bases, a cloud service like Office 365 could really strain the budget. What if your business has 1,000 users? 5,000? 10,000+? Even if you’re paying a few dollars per user per month, the total monthly cost for all those O365 subscription licenses adds up fast!

Let’s look at the whole conundrum enterprises using Skype for Business will have to face. It’s a quiet, creeping financial snarl…and it’s coming in just a few years.

Does Teams Cost Less than Skype for Business Server? No, and Here’s Why.

First, let’s talk numbers. Microsoft touts Office 365 and Teams as its “Intelligent Communications” option for businesses, and wants everyone to move to the O365 platform. Okay, fine. How does that work out cost-wise for enterprises?

Let’s say we have three businesses—one with 1,000 users, one with 5,000 users, and one with 10,000 users. How much would these businesses spend if they all used Teams (and Office 365)?

I’ll use two subscription levels here: E1 and E5. Why these? Because we’re finding that our O365 customers, even smaller ones, need one of these two levels the most. They need the backend services E1-E5 gives them. If they already have Office licenses, they go to E1. If not, E5.

I am using the Office 365 ROI Calculator for the monthly cost per user. It gives slight discounts on the regular costs.

E1 Monthly Costs*:

  • $6.59 x 1,000 users = $6,590/month x 12 = $79,080/year
  • $6.38 x 5,000 users = $31,900/month x 12 = $382,800/year
  • $6.18 x 10,000 users = $61,800/month x 12 = $741,600/year

E5 Monthly Costs*:

  • $28.82 x 1,000 users = $28,820/month x 12 = $345,840/year
  • $27.93 x 5,000 users = $139,650/month x 12 = $1,675,800/year
  • $27.04 x 10,000 users = $270,400/month x 12 = $3,244,800/year

(*Monthly values do not include initial setup fees or hardware maintenance.)

These numbers quickly move from ‘doable’ to ‘ridiculous.’ Dropping 3 million a year for Office 365?

Let’s compare these numbers to the cost of an on-prem Skype for Business Server. I’ll use numbers from a previous post on this topic:

Skype for Business Server with 1,000 Users:

  • 1 Front End Server License (MSRP) – $3,646.00
  • 1,000 Standard User CALs – $36.00 each, or $36,000 total
  • 1,000 Enterprise User CALs (Conferencing & desktop sharing) – $124.00 each, or $124,000 total
  • 1,000 Plus User CALs (Voice & call management) – $124.00 each, or $124,000 total

Total: $287,646

Exchange Server (for voicemail):

  • 1 Exchange Server (Enterprise) License – $4,051
  • 1,000 Standard User CALs (MS Open License) – $5.00 each, or $5,000 total
  • 1,000 Enterprise User CALs (MS Open License) – $55.00 each, or $55,000 total

Total: $64,051

Grand Total for 1,000 users: $351,697
(This is a three-year cost, and assumes no discounts.)

 

Skype for Business License Cost

You’ll need a few stacks of these…

Photo by Pepi Stojanovski on Unsplash

So if an enterprise with 1,000 users opted for an on-prem Skype for Business Server, it would cost roughly the same as 1 year of Office 365 E5. Fair enough. But the Skype for Business Server has a three-year usability period…

Assuming a 5% maintenance cost (about $17,500) for Years 2 and 3, they would end up paying $386,697 over those three years. If they went with E5 and didn’t have any maintenance costs at all, they’d end up paying $1,037,520.

At enterprise-level, Teams actually costs more than its predecessor!

The Quagmire: Skype for Business is Going Away

This is a serious cost discrepancy. Big enough to push larger businesses away from Office 365, back to on-prem.

Now, some enterprises would have no problem paying these amounts. They also get additional value from the related O365 services (see Addendum below). If so, great, more power to them! However, Accounting usually likes to save money. These numbers may cause them to balk.

What will the enterprise do if they want to save money? At these user counts, an on-prem server actually saves money. Sticking with Skype for Business Server makes economic and organizational sense.

But what about after Skype for Business Server 2019? Microsoft has not clarified if another version is on the roadmap. Given their merging all Skype for Business tools into Teams, it does not look likely. If there’s no on-prem version coming after 2019, then enterprises are stuck! They’ll have three choices:

  1. Move to Teams anyway,
  2. Keep their Skype for Business Server running as long as possible, and/or
  3. Switch to another on-prem Unified Communications provider.

On-Prem Skype for Business Alternatives for Future Succession

I cannot accurately speculate the Unified Communications landscape in 2020 and beyond. All I can do is look at what’s available now, and prognosticate their future offerings.

 

On-Prem Unified Communications Choices

2019 is coming fast.
Photo by Eric Rothermel on Unsplash.

If all you need is video conferencing and the cloud is OK, you should still have alternatives like Join.me, Appear.in, Workplace, or Slack. I don’t think any of these will go anywhere.

If you’ll need an on-prem, full-capability Skype for Business Server successor, I expect the following will still be around:

I’m NOT saying these solutions are better than Skype for Business Server (or Office 365 for that matter). Just presenting alternatives that have staying power.

Enterprises: The Time to Start Thinking about your On-Prem Skype for Business is Now

Microsoft’s push away from on-prem to the cloud has merits, in many respects. That said, just because a larger business has the budget to spend on lots of cloud services, doesn’t mean it’s the best use of the money. Office 365 may just not be the choice for them.

Unfortunately that presents a serious financial quagmire. It’s not here yet…but it’s coming.

(By the way, we will gladly support on-prem Skype for Business Servers into 2020. And beyond!)

Enterprise IT employees, what’s your Unified Communications outlook for the future?


ADDENDUM 5-17-18: As Mark pointed out in the comments, I didn’t factor in other Office 365 services as a pricing justification. This is true, and a good point for him to make. Office 365 does come with more than Teams – Exchange, SharePoint, OneDrive, etc. It also reduces the need for on-prem hardware and staff.

I don’t want to minimize the value here. O365 can be a huge help for businesses who need full-fledged IT infrastructures, and may not have the budget to build them on-prem. That said, I’m still not sure enterprises would gain financially from an Office 365 move as opposed to on-prem. At least as far as Skype for Business is concerned.

(I may do a follow-up post to address this part of the situation in more detail. Stay subscribed!)


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How to Prevent Malware Infections via Skype for Business

Like all computer systems, Skype for Business is vulnerable to cyberattack. Let’s talk about how to prevent one from happening.

What a Skype for Business Cyberattack Can Look Like

Skype for Business Down

We lost Skype AND email?!

Unfortunately, real-life circumstances prompted this post. We recently had to help a customer deal with a ransomware infection that affected most of their servers. (I’ll keep details private of course.)

The customer called us in a panic. They’d lost email, Skype for Business, and several client desktops. Someone had clicked a phishing link & triggered a Locky infection. We did have some backups available, but wound up having to wipe/replace a couple systems.

While this wasn’t the first time we’d helped resolve a ransomware infection, it was the first time the ransomware hit someone’s Skype for Business Server. I’m not sure the exact route Locky took to reach it, but I believe it got in via an abandoned administrator’s account. They had a systems admin leave the company a few months prior—but they hadn’t shut off his account!

The aftereffects: Four days of lost business, a bunch of angry clients, unknown number of emails lost, thousands spent on emergency support and replacement IT hardware.

(At least they didn’t have to pay the ransom on top of all that!)

Where Malware Can Reach Skype for Business

Skype4B isn’t just vulnerable through its Internet connection. As our example shows, it’s vulnerable from client-level too.

Here are the routes most malware/ransomware would take to reach & infect yours:

  • Front End Server. Where Skype4B lives.
  • Exchange Server. The server with which Skype4B interacts most often…which means the most potential routes for malware to take.
  • File Share. A BIG vulnerability. A shared folder through which users exchange files? It only takes one infected file, and your entire deployment’s in trouble.
  • End User Devices. Not just desktops/laptops now…even phones can carry malware into the office.

Malware Reaching Skype for BusinessNow we know where to watch. What kinds of protections do we put in place?

8 Ways to Protect your Skype for Business Server from Malware/Ransomware

1. Limit the number of Skype for Business admins.
Good admin practice extends to Skype for Business. Create ONLY the fewest number of administrator accounts as you need to manage the system. This includes admin accounts for all of the physical AND virtual servers on which Skype for Business runs.

2. Lock down permissions to the file share.
Controlling the file share’s permissions plugs that hole inside your Skype for Business Server. This blog post illustrates how to lock down the permissions: Keeping your Lync/Skype Business Environment safe from Ransomware – Enabling Technologies

3. Use intelligent routing in your perimeter network.
Restrict open ports on your Edge Server and Reverse Proxy to only those needed for Skype for Business traffic. Here are the port and protocol requirements.

4. Keep the Skype4B Server and its server components up-to-date.
Are you up to the March 2018 Cumulative Update? If not, here’s the download link: Skype for Business Server 2015 Cumulative Update KB3061064 – Download Center
Don’t forget the security patches & updates for your Windows Server as well. If nothing else, the security patches help keep those servers safe.

5. Secure all email servers with anti-malware software & monitoring.
Your Exchange Servers should have anti-malware protection too. The easiest method, of course, is to use a network-wide security gateways from providers like Sophos or F5.

6. Disable Office macros company-wide.
Not many malware apps use macros anymore. But that doesn’t mean it’s impossible. Use a Group Policy to block macros and forget about it.

7. Educate users about phishing/ransomware emails.
If you only do one of these, make it this one. User education goes further to prevent malware infections than any other factor. Users are typically the “weakest link” in cybersecurity…but it only takes some training to make them stronger.

(By the way—we offer cybersecurity education for businesses in the SF Bay Area. Just saying.)

8. Keep current backups.
Always, always keep backups! All servers should have two sets of automatic backups running…one kept on-site in case of a crash, and one kept off-site in case of malware infection. You probably do this already. But it’s too important to take for granted.

—-

“What if we use Skype for Business Online?” you might ask. Well, Microsoft has pretty decent security protections built into Office 365. But you can always make it better.

As Teams and Skype for Business are still on the path to merging, I don’t want to speculate too much on the anti-malware precautions you must take. That said, these stalwarts should always figure into your office’s IT infrastructure:

  • Limit the number of Office 365 admins
  • Use perimeter network protections
  • If you run a hybrid configuration, secure the on-prem server to the same level as your other servers
  • Educate users about phishing/ransomware
  • Keep current backups

Frustrated System AdminIf you’re already Teams users, strengthen Teams’ security with our post from December: 3 Ways to Protect Teams Users from Malware-Infected Files.

Don’t Make Skype for Business the Weak Link in Your Office’s Cybersecurity

It’s always harder to secure a server (any server!) after it’s already running. People don’t want to lose the service, even for a moment. If security updates cause an outage…well, we’ve all heard that particular scream, haven’t we?

That said, 15 minutes of downtime beats 4 days of lost business any day.

There are many layers to protect in Skype for Business: The Windows Servers on which it runs, the perimeter network, the Front End pool, inter-network traffic, and client devices. But, think of it this way…either you find the security holes, or a malware infection will.

Have you ever experience a malware infection on your Skype for Business Server? Please share your experience in the comments.

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What to Do When Skype4B Conversations Take Weeks to Appear in Outlook

You have a normal conversation in Skype for Business via Instant Messaging. The next day, you need to check the status of a task. You recall you mentioned this task in yesterday’s conversation. Better go check it in Conversation History.

Outlook is already open. You click the Conversation History folder and…wait, where’s the conversation? The last one you see is dated 2 weeks ago!

We ran up against this issue with a customer’s Skype for Business deployment. They had a server deployment, up and running since 2016. The Conversation History “delayed appearance” only started this past fall. Even more confusing, it didn’t occur for all users.

Work Conversation in Skype4B

“I KNOW I talked to Beth yesterday…”
Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash

The Cause: A Low Threshold for Conversation File Size

We checked all the obvious things, of course. But those were all clear. Only after testing & reviewing the Conversation History logs that did appear, followed by some MS research, did we find the cause.

Lync Server 2013 had an issue with long conversations. If a conversation’s history file ended up over 1MB in size, Lync Server could not upload the file to Exchange Server. This bug persisted into Skype for Business Server.

So if you end up having a long conversation with co-workers, plus a few images & documents shared around, your conversation grew past the server’s (tiny) 1MB limit!

The Solution: A Fix for Lync/Skype for Business Server, Then an Exchange Server Workaround

Microsoft did release a fix for this: KB3101496. It’s a security update issued November 10, 2015. Link to the update below.

This isn’t the only fix though. In fact, it might not even work for you. Not to worry…if it doesn’t, we have an alternative! The clever engineers posting on this thread determined it:
Lync 2013 Conversation History not taken from History Spooler by Outlook 2013 when bigger than 1 MB – TechNet

It’s an edit to an Exchange web.config file. Though from the thread and our own experience, we advise approaching the problem in this order:

  1. Apply the update first. Wait a few hours to determine if it took effect.
  2. If the update doesn’t work, use the following workaround.

Conversation History Bug Fix (KB3101496):

Security Update MS15-116 and MS15-123 for Lync 2013 (Skype for Business)
If your Skype for Business Server doesn’t already have this through Microsoft Update, you can download it here.

If Conversation History in Outlook doesn’t start updating within a few hours (happened for us after Hour 3), then try the web.config workaround.

Exchange Server Web.Config Workaround:

  1. Access your Exchange Server. Make sure you have write permissions.
  2. Navigate to the Exchange installation directory, e.g. C:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server.
  3. Open the version folder.
  4. Open the ClientAccess folder.
  5. Open the exchweb folder.
  6. Open the EWS folder.
  7. Edit the web.config file found here.
  8. Within the <appSettings> node, add the following line:
    <add key=”XmlMaxBytesPerRead” value=”1000000″ />
  9. Restart your IIS server.

Again, wait a few hours. The conversations should start trickling into Conversation History, in groups of 10 or so. You may need to restart Outlook & the Skype for Business client a few times to get everything.

Sometimes Conversation Logs Delay Their Appearance. Call Them Out on Stage with These Fixes!

This is an issue which can fly under the radar. Our customer saw no error messages, and had no Outlook crashes related to it. They only noticed when someone did exactly what I portrayed earlier—tried to check a previous Skype4B conversation via their Outlook Conversation History.

Take a second to review your Outlook Conversation History. Hopefully this bug doesn’t affect you…but it doesn’t hurt to check!

Have you experienced a Conversation History “delayed appearance” in Outlook, or something similar?

 

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How the Edge Server Fits into Skype for Business

“What’s the Edge Server do?”

One of our team members fielded this question while on-site the other day. He’d just finished describing the Skype for Business topology we proposed for the customer’s business (hybrid deployment, across 3 offices). One of the users piped up right afterward.

Now to his credit, my co-worker answered the question immediately, and (from his impressions) to the user’s satisfaction. He’d mentioned it to me only in passing. But, me being me, I seized on it as a good post idea.

We’re all about educating users here. In case another user at that customer site, or a future customer’s, still has questions? Let’s take a detailed look at what goes into an Edge Server.

(Please note: We will not discuss Reverse Proxies or Load Balancers in this post. If you want to hear more about these, I’m happy to dedicate a post to each. Please comment if so.)

The Edge Server’s Primary Role

The Edge Server grants Skype for Business access to users outside the internal network. These are mobile users, remote users, federated users (e.g. partners, vendors), and sometimes even customers.

Without the Edge Server, these external users can’t send or receive IM, take phone calls, or join in Online Meetings.

How does it do that? Essentially, by acting as an IP intermediary. It translates external IP addresses into internal IP addresses to facilitate the external user connections. As such, the Edge will need routable public IPs assigned to it (or non-routable private IPs, if you use NAT).

Skype for Business Servers

That’s our Edge Server right there. No, that one.

Main Components of an Edge Server

Each Edge Server runs four main services.

  1. Access Edge. This service gives users a trusted connection for inbound & outbound SIP traffic. Like a private road through the Internet.
  2. Web Conferencing Edge. This service allows an external user to join Online Meetings running on your Skype for Business Server. A virtual “ticket to the show,” as it were.
  3. A/V Edge. This service enables audio/video, application sharing, and file transfer for external users while in said Meetings. That way you’re not missing out on any parts of the conversation.
  4. XMPP Proxy. Finally, this service sends & receives XMPP messages (eXtensible Messaging and Presence Protocol) from federated partners. It makes sure external users can still talk with federated users.
    • NOTE: This is not required for all Edge Servers. You may need an XMPP gateway running on the Front End as well.

Other Servers Edge Communicates With

Front End. Obviously, the Edge Server will communicate the most with the Front End (Standard or Enterprise Edition). Otherwise external user connections would just vanish!

Office 365 Cloud. If you’re running a hybrid configuration, the Edge Server will have to communicate with Office 365 servers. Edge will treat the Office 365 tenant as a federated partner, so make sure SIP Federation is enabled.

Exchange UM Server. Edge must communicate with Unified Messaging, in order for external users to get their voicemails.

Persistent Chat Server. For topologies supporting Persistent Chat, the Edge Server will need to communicate with its server. Access Edge needs to facilitate external users joining chats.

Reverse Proxy, Firewall, Load Balancer. Together with the Edge Server, these servers/tools create the “perimeter network.” They protect your network from unauthorized access (e.g. malware), while letting authenticated users through.

Edge Server Functionality

A Microsoft diagram illustrating some of the Edge Server’s functions. It keeps busy. Image courtesy of Microsoft.com.

Is One Edge Server Enough?

For most offices, yes. One Edge Server can handle 12,000 concurrent users. But for high-availability topologies, you can collocate Edge Servers.

Reminder: Don’t Forget about Mobile User Access

When configuring an Edge Server, make sure you’ve addressed mobile users. We’ve had to reconfigure Edge Servers which were set up properly for most remote users…but mobile apps didn’t have access the moment they left the office.

Every Time You Use Skype for Business on the Road, Thank Your Edge Server

Among our customers, IM is the most-used Skype for Business tool benefiting from the Edge Server. But inviting customers or vendors into an Online Meeting is the most valued benefit.

“You mean they can actually join the meeting too? Just like each of us?” Yes, they sure can! Thanks to the Edge Server. Show it a little love.

(I’m not actually sure how you’d do that. Do servers appreciate it when you clean their fans?)

Did you have a question about what Edge Servers do, or how they do it? Please comment or email your thoughts.

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Four “Real-World” Updates Now Available for Skype for Business Server

Microsoft has released a June 2016 Update for Skype for Business Server! It contains 4 new features:

  1. Video Based Screen Sharing
  2. Multiple Emergency Number
  3. Busy Options
  4. Offline Message

All of which struck me as having something in common: They’re all very useful in real-world office scenarios.

Accordingly, I’ll define them using examples of office scenarios today! Let’s dive in and see what Microsoft has given us.


Scenario: “When Beth shares her screen, the meeting gets slow and jerky.”
Solution: Video Based Screen Sharing

How Video Based Screen Sharing Works
When you install the new update, Video based Screen Sharing (VbSS) equips your Skype for Business Server to use UDP in its screen sharing. Previously, screen sharing used RDP. This should give a performance boost and help Meeting quality, even on lower-bandwidth connections.

Video based Screen Sharing for Skype for Business Server 2015 – Microsoft TechNet

Best of all, you don’t have to configure anything! VbSS is enabled by default.


Scenario: “We have people visiting from the UK office this month. They won’t know our phone system.”
Solution: Multiple Emergency Number

How Multiple Emergency Number Works
Just like the name implies, Multiple Emergency Number enables you to set multiple emergency numbers using PowerShell. It’s a location policy update which you control.

The major value here is for larger businesses with international workers moving between locations. Let’s consider a business with 2 offices: one in the U.S., and one in the U.K. Each office has a Site in Skype for Business. Each Site’s location policy has its own local emergency number. For the U.S., emergency is 911. But in the U.K., it’s 999.

Using Multiple Emergency Number, you can add multiple masks for all other site’s emergency numbers. In order to add 999 as a mask in the U.S. Skype location policy, you’d use these cmdlets:

$a = New-CsEmergencyNumber -DialString 911 -DialMask 999
New-CsLocationPolicy -Identity [YourID] -EmergencyNumbers @{add=$a} -EnhancedEmergencyServicesEnabled $True -PstnUsage [emergency PSTN usage]

Saves training time, and makes everyone a little safer.

There’s many other ways you can use Multiple Emergency Number. Have a look at its TechNet page for examples: Multiple emergency numbers can now be set in location policy in Skype for Business Server 2015 – Microsoft TechNet


Scenario: “X is calling. I really can’t (or don’t want to) talk to them right now.”
Solution: Busy Options

How Busy Options Works
Busy Options is a new voice policy. With it installed, you can configure Skype for Business to give callers a busy signal if they call someone who’s already on a call, or send them to voicemail. The person called then receives a notice in their inbox for either a missed call or voicemail.

Some of this functionality already existed in Skype for Business Server. Busy Options expands upon it. Conferencing, Team Calls, and Response Groups all benefit from it. Each gains several options–for example, users in conferences can still new conference invitations. But new peer-to-peer calls are rejected according to their Busy Options settings.

In terms of applicability, the documentation indicates that you can enable Busy Options down to the single-user level. But, doing so for an entire enterprise is more commonly referenced.

Installing & configuring Busy Options is more involved than the other updates listed here. I’ll link to the Deployment page to make things easier: Install and configure Busy Options for Skype for Business Server – Microsoft TechNet


Scenario: “Bob is offline again! I need to send him this.”
Solution: Offline Message

How Offline Message Works
Offline Message leverages Exchange Web Services to send messages from a Skype for Business client to another user’s Exchange mailbox. If the user is offline, the message gets stored with Exchange. Effectively, it allows you to send messages to someone who’s offline.

When you do, you (the sender) will see a notification like this:

Offline Message Alert

Photo courtesy of Microsoft.

They (the recipient) will see an orange dot on their Conversations icon. Just like the red dot on the iPhone’s apps, it means, “Hey! You have missed messages!”

To enable Offline Message:

Open the Skype for Business Server Management Shell.
Run the following cmdlet: Set-CsImConfiguration -EnableOfflineIM $True
To confirm, run: Get-CsImConfiguration
Finally, confirm that the “EnableIMAutoArchiving” property is set to True with Get-CsClientPolicy. Otherwise Offline Message won’t work. (It should be set to True by default, but make sure.)

Enable or Disable Offline Instant Messaging (IM) in Skype for Business Server 2015 – Microsoft TechNet


New Skype4B Tools to Make Everyday Office Work Easier

We’ve installed these on our Skype for Business Server as of this post. Testing has already commenced! So far I’ve received one Offline Message. If any snags come up, I’ll make sure to document them here.

Which of these “real-world” updates do you think will benefit your company the most? Please comment or email your thoughts. And we’ll see you next time!

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